Good dishes in Malaysia (Part 4)

Good dishes in Malaysia (Part 4)
UPDATED: 18 Nov 2017 6 Views

Information about amazing dishes in Malaysia.

24. Satar

If otak-otak is the hodge-podge, hot dog variety of grilled fish, then satar is its more refined cousin.

At one bazaar in Kelana Jaya, Malaysia, a vendor has set up what he calls “mackerel-filled food from the east coast.”

Roasted in a banana leaf, the process and look are a Photostat of otak-otak, but with more fish, less spice and larger portions.

25. Roti canai

An Indian-inspired flatbread, roti canai is made with flour, butter and water, though some will toss condensed milk in to sweeten it up. 

The whole concoction is flattened, folded, oiled and cooked on a heavily oiled skillet, resulting in a sublimely fluffy piece of bread with a crispy exterior.

You can eat this one as a snack on its own or use it to scoop up a side of curry. 

26. Satay

Though considered by many to be a dish native to Thailand, satay is actually believed to have originated in Indonesia. 

Origins aside, can we all just agree that meat on a stick is good?

Malaysia has its own variations of the grilled skewers, served nationwide in chicken, beef or pork forms (the latter in non-Muslim venues only).

Sauces vary from region to region, including the peanut sauce that’s loved the world over. 

27. Ikan bakar

 

Ikan bakar @ Wikipedia

The direct translation of this dish means "burned fish."

You shouldn't let that turn you off. This is one tasty grilled bit of seafood. 

After being marinated in the all-important sambal, the fish is placed on a banana leaf and grilled over a flame. Great for sharing. 

28. Mee rebus

In case you haven't noticed, Malaysia has done a lot with the simple Chinese noodle.

Another one to set your taste buds into party mode, mee rebus is made with blanched yellow noodles drowned in an insanely addictive curry-like potato-based gravy and spices like lemongrass and ginger.

It's similar to mee goreng.

Common proteins added to the mix include prawns, mutton and dried anchovies.

Garnishes include lime, spouts and halved boiled eggs.  

29. Gulai ayam kampung

Gulai ayam kampung @ Inilah Duniaku - blogger

This chicken curry dish can be cooked in a number of ways. For instance, in the "village" style, traditional herbs and potatoes are tossed in.  

The best thing about gulai ayam is the smell. Turmeric and kaffir lime leaves, plus lemongrass, give it an irresistible aroma. Palm sugar and coconut paste add that extra oomph to knock your socks off. 

30. Lor bak 

A Nyonya specialty of Penang, lor bak is braised pork that has been marinated in five-spice powder before being wrapped in soft bean curd skin and deep-fried. 

Lor bak is served with two dipping sauces, a spicy red chili sauce and a gravy thickened with cornstarch and a beaten egg called lor.

31. Char kuey teow

We asked author and chef Norman Musa, one of Malaysia's most famous exports, which dish he'd be outraged not to see on a list of the country's top dishes. This is the one. 

Another one to thank China’s migrants for, char kuey teow –- made with flat rice noodles –- is one of Southeast Asia’s most popular noodle dishes.

The noodles are fried with pork lard, dark and light soy sauce, chili, de-shelled cockles, bean sprouts, Chinese chives and sometimes prawn and egg.

Essential to the dish is good “wok hei” or breath of wok, the qualities and tastes imparted by cooking on a wok using high heat.

To be continued…

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